Tokyo Kills Me: Photos

Tokyo Kills me, 2008

Ongoing Updates (5.26.18). Snapshots from daily life in and around Tokyo, a.k.a. “The Big Sushi,” at the end of the second millennium and the start of the third.

Check out the most recent pictures posted, circa 2007-2008, at Tokyo Kills Me: Photos

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Tokyo Kills Me: Photos

Ongoing Updates (5.20.18). Snapshots from daily life in and around Tokyo, a.k.a. “The Big Sushi,” at the end of the second millennium and the start of the third.

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See more snaps at Tokyo Kills Me: Photos 

Home Sweet Home Hokkaido 1998 – 2002

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I lived in rural Hokkaido from 1998 – 2002, my first four years in Japan. I loved the fields and mountains, the champagne powder snow and rich, saturated island light.

It was on Hokkaido that my passion for photography really developed, so to speak. Unfortunately, I had little money for such an expensive pastime – a roll of film was a luxury – and digital cameras were still bleeding-edge tech.

I did, however, take a few keepers, which were later scanned and I have now uploaded to the series Home Sweet Home Hokkaido 1998 – 2002: Photos.

Take a look at Medium.com https://medium.com/series/9cb2804d546a

 

 

Tokyo Snow Days

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I love Tokyo in the snow. It usually only happens a few times a year — only once so far this year — and when it does it never lasts.

When it does snow, the “ocean effect” light dry powder blows in from the Sea of Japan, it transforms this Blade-Runneresque megacity into a magical, fantastical winter wonderland.

Brilliant!

Tokyo Snow Days   https://medium.com/the-big-sushi/tokyo-snow-days-a5171244e6ad

Snow Monsters of Zao

Snow Monsters of Zao; Tohoku Japan

By some measures, Japan is the snowiest place on earth, and winter in areas such as the Tohoku region north of Tokyo add to that rep. The Zaosan (蔵王山) mountains, on the border between Miyagi and Yamagata prefectures, for example, gets around 12 metres dumped on its forested slopes each season. That’s a far cry from the 40-metre (120-plus feet) epic blanket that smothers the Japanese Alps around Nagano each year (there’s a reason houses in the countryside traditionally have a second front door, upstairs), but still more than enough to transform this range of stratovolcanoes, crater lakes, and subalpine fir trees into a magical fantastical winter wonderland each year…

Read the rest of the story and see more pictures at https://medium.com/the-big-sushi/snow-monsters-of-zao-japan-9f6853a2523

Mount Mitakesan Photo Gallery

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The stairs to Musashi Mitake Shrine

For more than ten years R. and I have visited the Shinto shrine at the summit of Mount Mitakesan, the village of minshuku and restaurants below, the “Rock Garden” river course, and the trails to surrounding peaks such as Mount Otakesan and Mount Hinodesan.

In order to create this gallery of pictures from those trips, I have gone back to the earliest scans of pictures I shot back in the days of film photography, when my pride and joy was a Konica Hexar Silver camera and rolls of Fuji Velvia and Provia. I’ll continue to add pictures, though it will take time: we average maybe three trips a year, and we’re going again this weekend!

You can view the Mount Mitakesan gallery on 500px, or see all the galleries on 500px on my gallery landing page…